Total Exercise Bike Guide

Including an exercise bike in your weekly exercise regime is a great way to keep fit, lose weight and build up your stamina. Combined with a more sensible diet, you achieve the results you want.

Stationary bikes (or exercise bikes) are easy to use, can be found in almost every gym, and are usually reasonably priced and requiring minimal space if you’re thinking of buying. Exercise bikes offer a simple and massively effective workout. If you like cycling but don’t want to risk a confrontation with a speeding car or getting drenched in a torrential downpour, or just prefer to switch off and zone out during your workout sessions, consider an exercise bike.We lift the lid on this popular form of exercise so you can get the most from your workouts

(C) valleyymca.org

(C) valleyymca.org

If you don’t have an exercise bike but still want to do some indoor cycling, you can convert your regular bike into an exercise bike by using a so-called turbo trainer or putting your bike on specially designed rollers. Both methods allow you to use your regular bike indoors which is great if you prefer to cycle out of doors but winter weather or heavy traffic means you can’t.

Cycling is predominantly a lower body workout. The following muscles are your “main movers” responsible for pushing your pedals around and around…

Front and back of thighs (quadriceps & hamstring muscles)
Butt (gluteus maximus)
Calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus)

When you get up and out of the saddle to sprint or replicate climbing a hill, your core and upper body muscles also get in on the act but they are not working against an especially heavy resistance so any benefits to these muscles are limited.

Read more: http://healthandstyle.com/fitness/exercise-bike-guide

 

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